Events: You’re Invited

Join the celebration of the spirit of emancipation in the 150 Year Anniversary of The Emancipation Proclamation

Emancipation: Becoming Free – Go Fly a Kite,Tuesday, October 1, 7:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Steve Shoemaker and President Bill Clinton

Steve Shoemaker and President Bill Clinton

Rev. Steve Shoemaker, host of Univ. of Illinois Public Radio interview program “Keepin’ the Faith” and published poet. Location: Shepherd of the Hill Presbyterian Church, 145 Engler Blvd. in Chaska

The Slaves Speak: Voices from Slavery, Tuesday, October 15, 7:00 p.m.

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth

Anticipating Emancipation Day (Oct. 26) Shepherd of the Hill Dialogues presents dramatic readings from the hearts and minds of the slaves and ex-slaves, like Sojourner Truth, pictured here with Abraham Lincoln.

Dramatic readings, insight into the period, the movement toward emancipation in our own time, and communal singing of the songs from the cotton fields (Swing Low, Sweet Chariot; My Lord! What a Morning, and other spirituals).
Location: Shepherd of the Hill Presbyterian Church.

Emancipation Day Celebration, Saturday, October 26 3:15 – 8:30 P.M. Location: Chaska High School

Sojourner Truth and President Abraham Lincoln

Sojourner Truth and President Abraham Lincoln

Mark the 150th Anniversary year of the Emancipation Proclamation celebrate the spirit of on-going spirit of emancipation for our time. Guest speaker and Music by guest artists Dennis Spears, Jerry Steele, Momoh Freeman , and the Valley Band and Chaska High School Choir.

Sponsors for Oct. 26 Emancipation Day Celebration: the Cities of Carver, Chanhassen Chaska and Victoria (Mayor’s Proclamations); Chaska Police Department, Chaska Human Rights Commission; Shepherd of the Hill Presbyterian Church; District 112 Office of Community Education; Carver County Library.

Poetic night view from the plains

Twilight on the Plains

Three things up above tonight,
No, four: last, a star, (the kite
First reached altitude), a hot
Air balloon was second, third,
Bright against the dark-turned
Sky–precisely half a moon.

Matches lit the hurricane
Lantern and a pipe beside
Rocking chair, plants, on side
Porch. Horizon towns show light
After light: gold, yellow, white.
Flashing red antennas point…

– Steve Shoemaker, Urbana, IL, September 21, 2003.

Join Steve for an evening of poetry on the theme “Becoming Free: Go Fly a Kite” Tuesday, October 1 at 7:00 p.m. Steve’s visit is part of the Shepherd of the Hill Presbyterian Church’s Tuesday Dialogues Program: examining critical public issues locally and globally. Steve will look at emancipation – both social and personal – in advance of a major celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the Emancipation Declaration here in Chaska, MN on Saturday, October 26 at Chaska High School.

Out of the Mouth of William Stringfellow

Jacket of "My People Is the Enemy"

Jacket of “My People Is the Enemy”

“Let all religious people beware. Their earnest longing for God is predicated on the reservation on their part that it is necessary for them to do something to find God. The Word of God in the Bible, however, is that God does not await human initiative of any sort but seeks and finds [people] where they are, wherever it be.”

– William Stringfellow, Count It All Joy (Eerdman’s, 1967).

Inspired by Stringfellow’s writings, six students at McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago gathered weekly at 6:00 a.m. on Wednesday mornings with Professor Bruce Rigdon to reflect together on our late-night (10: p.m. – 2:00 a.m.) “bar ministry” at Poor Richard’s, a “secular” place, in light of Stringfellow’s writings. God was already present everywhere; our privilege was to recognize it in the world.

Outside the fence at the seminary students from the Moody Bible Institute targeted McCormick people with tracts that threatened Hell for the liberal “sinners” who didn’t recognize the depth of human depravity. They wanted to save the “wretched” seminarians who scorned every hint of a shame and guilt as the starting point of the Christian faith. We believed that grace was amazing and that it was everywhere, but Amazing Grace‘s “saved a wretch like me” was the language of Moody, a wallowing in shame and guilt from which we were proud to have been freed.

It’s 1966 in Chicago’s Old Town entertainment district. Kay Zimmerman, a dear friend and classmate who lost her sight at the age of nine, and I walk into Poor Richards arm-in-arm. The bar is unusually full. A young man jumps up on a table with his guitar and starts to strum out  the hymn we seminary students ridiculed for it’s wretched theology of human wretchedness: “Amazing grace, how sweet the sound That saved a wretch like me…” and everyone rose to their feet to join . “I once was lost but now am found, was blind but now I see.”

Several years following ordination, the Chaplain of Milliken University (Decatur, IL) invited me to an evening with “Bill” Stringfellow. It was two weeks before Stringfellow was to undergo major exploratory surgery for a misdiagnosed illness that threatened his life. During an evening in Bill Bodamer’s home Stringfellow spoke in terms that captured my attention in a new way.

It was during that visit that I began to move theologically from the prevalent paradigm of good v. evil to what Stringfellow argued was the biblical paradigm of life v. death. Even yet today, I am still moving from under the spell of my own form of pietistic slavery to “goodness” into the freedom for which Christ has set me free.

Over the years that followed, Bill became a guest in our home during his visits to campus ministry programs at University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Northern New York Campus Ministry (Canton, NY), and The College of Wooster (Wooster, OH). My children remember this frail man with the searching eyes, sensing perhaps that his physical frailty not only revealed a human frailty he never denied but a powerful faith in God’s great extravagance.

The absolution from pietism is that there is no way at all to please God, no way to strike a bargain  with Him, no necessity to meet Him half-way,…no way in which His godliness can be diluted in dependency upon human enterprise. The futility of pietism, ending as it does in honoring death in the name of fidelity to God, is that God has triumphed over death already, in the here and now of this life. What is given to men, in that triumph, is not to add to God’s achievement, since it is decisive, and it is not to complete His work, since God is not negligent, and much less to ridicule God’s passion for this world by resort to moralistic legalism, mechanistic ritualism, doctrinaire meanness or any similar religious exercises.

“The vocation of men is to enjoy their emancipation from the power of death wrought by God’s vitality in this world. The crown of life is  the freedom to live now, for all the strife and ambiguity and travail, in the imminent transcendence of death, and all of death’s threats and temptation. This is the gift of God to all in Christ’s Resurrection.

“Men of this vocation count all trials as joys, for, though every trial be an assault of the power of death, in every trial is God’s defeat of death verified and manifested.”

– William Stringfellow,  conclusion of Count It All Joy

“Let all religious people beware.”