Over and Over, We Forget

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The Wall Street Bull

The public’s memory is very short. The panic of near economic collapse 10 years ago is all but wiped from public memory two weeks before the Nov. 6 American national election. We publish the following chapter from Be Still! Departure from Collective Madness (2017, Wipf & Stock), which first appeared as a guest column on MinnPost.com September 10, 2009.

SORROW FLOATS

Concepts, like individuals, have their histories

and are just as incapable of withstanding

the ravages of time as individuals. But in and

through all this they retain a kind of homesickness

for the scenes of their childhood 

[Soren Kierkegaard]

“Sorrow floats.”

Perhaps the line from John Irving’s The Hotel New Hampshire in which “Sorrow,” the stuffed family dog preserved by a taxidermist, floats to the surface of the lake after a plane crash, helps explain what is happening in America.

Something dear to the American family died in September/October, 2008. Prior to the series of chilling events of that period, most of us had lived with the illusion of relative economic and financial health. Then, suddenly, Sorrow was rushed to the emergency room for government resuscitation.

Since then our memories of that pre-October 2008 world have taken a turn that families often take at funerals when the eulogies bear little resemblance to the reality of the deceased. We’re quarreling over what was real and what is mythical reconstruction.

Following the plane wreck that takes the lives of the Berry family parents in Irving’s The Hotel New Hampshire, the stuffed family pet bobs to the surface of the lake, floating among the wreckage. Sorrow floats. So does the thing we lost last fall.

What died? A ruling assumption

What died last year was the ruling assumption that an unregulated free-market system was the best way to organize an economy and that laissez-faire capitalism is democracy’s natural ally. The market almost crashed. It didn’t crash only because the federal government intervened to prevent a repeat of the crash of 1929. Sometime between mid-September and October seventh, when Congress passed its bill to stabilize the financial markets, the myth of the virtue of deregulated capitalism died. It was stuffed by the taxidermy of government intervention, but it still floats.

When a conviction or a myth dies, it doesn’t go away. It continues to bob to the surface. Sometimes, as in the case of the Berry family, the old dog is much easier to love after it is dead. Sorrow—obese, lethargic, and persistently flatulent in its old age—no longer waddles through the dining room to foul the air and ruin everyone’s dinner. In the public psyche, the unpleasant memories of the real life Sorrow give way to the stuffed Sorrow, a thing of nostalgia that lives on . . . even after it’s dead, and long after the plane has crashed.

Over and over, we forget

Sorrow and its old illusions float every time the reconstructed memory, forgetting the real Sorrow, barks about “socialism.” Sorrow floats every time we shout each other down in town-hall meetings. Sorrow floats every time nostalgia forgets that it was only by government intervention with our tax dollars that Sorrow is still around. Sorrow floats every time we forget the voracious appetite, unscrupulous predatory practices, insatiable greed, and the obesity that led to the deaths of Lehmann Brothers, Merrill Lynch, and Bear Stearns, not to mention insurance giant AIG and all the banks that had taken the plunge into a market of deregulated derivatives and mortgages that led to the epidemic of home foreclosures, bankruptcies, pension-fund collapses, and job losses. Sorrow, the old dog that failed us, still floats and still barks a year after the crash when the mind forgets and nostalgia remembers a system we thought was working in our interest.

Old ideas and convictions die hard. The powerful economic forces that grew fat during the years when government was viewed as the people’s enemy will stoke the fires of public anxiety and anger, taking advantage of the floating Sorrow that reminds us of something that we love more in retrospect than we did the day it died of its own obesity.

  • Gordon C. Stewart, Chaska, MN, October 21, 2018.

10 thoughts on “Over and Over, We Forget

  1. Free Market Capitalism is the Provence of the poor. Socialism is the domain of the .001%. William Chambliss.
    PS the aforementioned firms levered their CAPITAL 50+times. The value of the asset falls 2% and BROKE.

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  2. Sorrow floats. Hotel New Hampshire is one of my favorite books. I don’t like Irving’s later books, but I loved that one and read it over and over. Too bad the movie didn’t work. I would have loved to see the director’s cut of that.

    Sorrow floats. You just can’t keep it underwater. It always pops to the surface. I have NO idea how this election will go. We will do what we can. For good or ill, we’ll vote as we vote, for whatever good that will do. But I’m more optimistic about the Red Sox winning the series than of that famed ‘blue wave.”

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    • Like you, Marilyn, I do what I can. I fear the blue wave is a fantasy. There’s too much RNC, other GOP money, PAC, and lobbyist money pouring in to close races across the country. As happened with the Willie Horton ad, the ads are dirty and demagogic. I was taught that it is the job of the preacher (consider that term broadly) to unmask the idols to expose the truth.

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  3. Unfortunately, you’ll appreciate:
    John Quiggen, Zombie Economics: How Dead Ideas Still Walk Among Us (Princeton University Press, 2010).

    It would be nicer if people didn’t need to write this kind of thing, though.

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  4. Yes. When I think about a concept floating, I usually go first to Hope. Now I have a new image – Sorrow, and with it a whole new way of thinking about what floats…! Thanks for once again broadening my world, Gordon.

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